Site visit gives opponents chance to have their say on house building

April 28 2017

OBJECTIONS to the latest scheme for large scale housing in Thornbury were voiced when planners visited the project site on the north side of the town.

OBJECTIONS to the latest scheme for large scale housing in Thornbury were voiced when planners visited the project site on the north side of the town.

Ainscough Strategic Land had originally applied for outline permission to put 180 homes on the farmland to the west of Gloucester Road, opposite the already developed Thornbury Fields homes.

But those attending the sites inspection claimed they were told the number had now been cut to 130.

Thornbury Town Council is opposing the plan as the site is outside the town’s development boundary.

It said it was a further example of “speculative and unplanned development” which would lead to a significant and unsustainable percentage increase in Thornbury’s population.

The council said Thornbury had already accepted enough new development to meet its housing needs and it was unfair that it should accommodate even more to meet South Gloucestershire’s five-year housing land supply requirement.

It has also raised “serious concerns” about drainage and flooding in the area, “dangerous” access to the site, the size of homes proposed, “unimaginative” layout and “bland assortment” of properties, as well as increased traffic and road safety fears.

Residents’ group TRAPPD - Thornbury Residents Against Poorly Planned Development - was represented at the site visit.

Spokesman Roger Hall said: “Ainscough said it was reducing the number of homes from 180 to 130.”

But he said the scheme still pushed the settlement boundary beyond Post Farm and TRAPPD would rather the development wasn’t built at all.

Its concerns mirror those of the town council and it has questioned where all the new residents are going to work as job opportunities locally are limited.

It is also pushing for brownfield sites to be considered for housing ahead of green space.

Mr Hall said: “Once these farm fields have gone, they’ve gone forever. We are just fighting for a bit of common sense.”

Objectors have also pointed out a lack of public transport and the pressure on schools and health services from the increased population.

Meanwhile Oldbury-on-Severn Parish Council has added its objection to the scheme on several grounds, including its worries about flood and surface water travelling downstream and exacerbating existing flood issues in Oldbury.